Share your opinions on transforming community safety by Nov. 20 with this quick survey

 

Minneapolis community, please provide your input on what community safety looks like and tell us your ideas about a new model of community safety for the City. You can take the survey in English, Spanish, Somali, Hmong or Oromo.

Complete the survey by Nov. 20th, 2020 for the first phase of survey results. Input provided after Nov. 20th may continue to be used for future engagement phases.  In June 2020, the City Council pledged to create a new model of community safety. As part of that, we committed to a yearlong process of community engagement. This survey is one of the first steps in that process. Through the survey, you can share your vision for a new community safety model. You can also provide ideas for how to accomplish that new model.

Results from the survey will be used to help create recommendations for elected leaders and to help guide the City’s next steps for community engagement. This survey includes some questions similar to other recent City surveys. That includes questions about alternative responses to mental health crises and non-emergency crimes. Any input you already provided on those surveys is valued and will still be used as planned. Recommendations will also be considered as part of this broader focus on transforming community safety.

Take the survey and share it with your community:

You can also check back to stay up to date on progress and more opportunities to provide input.


In response to the recent uptick in criminal behavior in the 1st Precinct, please take note of these safety reminders the City of Minneapolis has recommended.

Please, also share this information with friends and neighbors. Together we can protect each other & look out for one another!

Personal Safety
• Be aware of your surroundings.
• Always. Look at and take note of who is near you or your vehicle
• When driving, keep your doors and windows locked
• Take note of vehicle descriptions, license plate numbers or suspect descriptions
• Do not leave your vehicle running and DO NOT leave keys or a fob inside the car
• Maintain good social distance from strangers
• Do not walk and text
• Be wary of someone asking for the time, change, directions, to use your phone
• Carry only what you need in a secure pocket.
• Avoid carrying a purse. If you do, utilize a smaller bag & carry it under your coat 
• Consider a self-defense class to increase confidence when out in public
• Use a buddy system when walking, if possible
• Walk in well lit, well-traveled areas 
• Do not carry your cell phone in your hand. Keep it safely in an inside pocket, not it in your back pocket

Phones and Financial Security
• Always have your IMEI and serial number for your phone in a safe place 
• Keep an electronics inventory list with serial numbers and product descriptions
• Consider a “track my phone” app
• Use a pass code to lock your phone when not in use
• Hide all apps for banking, credit cards and cash apps in an “incognito” file
• Record all your credit card, driver’s license, banking, and pass code information
• Know how to access accounts and institutions incase of loss or fraud

Vehicles
• NEVER leave keys or a fob in your car EVER 
• Look around before entering or exiting your vehicle
• Check your owner’s manual for a valet key and remove it
• Don’t leave a spare key hidden or in another vehicle
• LOCK YOUR DOORS, even when parked in an access-controlled garage
• Do not leave personal property in plain sight
• Keep doors locked when driving
• Call 911 if intimidated on the road, stay on the phone with 911, do not engage

Residences and Garages
• Keep ALL doors and windows locked – even inside multi-unit dwelling
• Use your deadbolt
• Do not prop open any exterior doors
• Be mindful of common use outside doors (front doors, overhead garage door)
• DO NOT allow someone to follow you into the building
• If you live on the ground floor be vigilant about your access points
• Utilize available lighting or consider adding more
• Do not leave valuables unsecured. Record serial numbers of bicycles 
• If you keep your bicycle in the garage, lock it to a rack bolted to the floor or wall
• Do not leave your garage door opener in your vehicle
• Lock your vehicle when parked inside the garage and do not leave valuables 
• Maintain good key and access card/fob control
• Consider forming a building or block club to share information
• Whether single family or multi-unit, ensure your security cameras are operational and are good quality. Cameras rarely prevent a crime, they are excellent in aiding an investigation and subsequent arrest

Call 911 to report assaults, robberies or car jackings.  IF YOU BECOME A VICTIM OF CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR - FILE A POLICE REPORT. Call 311 or go to Minneapolis.Gov to file a theft report

FOR QUESTIONS OR CONCERNS, PLEASE CALL THE 1ST PRECINCT AT 612-673-5701 or contact Crime Prevention Specialists Renee.Allen@MinneapolisMN.gov or Carla.Nielson@MinneapolisMN.gov for further assistance and/or guidance.


 


Minneapolis City Council president Lisa Bender (third from left, top row) and Council Vice President Andrea Jenkins (third from right, bottom row) City Council members: Kevin Reich, Cam Gordon, Steve Fletcher, Phillipe Cunningham, Jeremiah Ellison, Abdi Warsame, Lisa Goodman, Alondra Cano, Jeremy Schroeder, Andrew Johnson and Linea Palmisano.

 

The City Council has created an outline for the public to weigh in on policing, police responses, public health-oriented violence prevention, law enforcement reforms and/or changes to protocols and practices.

Recommendations made through this process will focus on but may not be limited to intermediate policy changes, investments and partnerships that support a public health approach to community safety, alternatives to policing, and research and engagement to inform the potential creation of a new Department of Community Safety. There will be a review and analysis of existing models, programs, and practices that could be applied in Minneapolis.

The City Council’s plan regarding the future of policing and the proposed community engagement plan for public safety changes and improvements.

The process is divided into four parts:

  1. Phase One (October 2020 - December 2020):  A community survey and public forums focused on the current model of community safety and opportunities for changes, with a synthesis of initial themes presented to the Council in early December along with a draft vision for consideration and adoption by the Council

  2. Phase Two (January 2021 - March 2021):  Public forums where community members can review and confirm the themes and goals established in the first phase plus a deeper dive into ideas for a new public safety model to help inform draft recommendations of actions steps to realize the established vision and goals

  3. Phase Three (April 2021 - May 2021):  Opportunities to offer feedback on draft recommendations at public forums and online

  4. Phase Four (June 2021 - July 2021):  Recommendations will be refined and finalized, incorporating community feedback gathered throughout the engagement process, with a final report to the Council on strategies for building a new model for community safety

The process is guided by the principles of accessibility, and meaningful and inclusive engagement. It will be open to all community members who wish to participate.

Recommendations made through this process will focus on but may not be limited to intermediate policy changes, investments and partnerships that support a public health approach to community safety, alternatives to policing, and research and engagement to inform the potential creation of a new Department of Community Safety. There will be a review and analysis of existing models, programs, and practices that could be applied in Minneapolis.

This process will build on the work already underway to refine and improve our 911 response and shift certain calls for help to responders other than MPD. It will also identify resources needed to support recommendations.

    published Public Safety 2020-10-06 19:31:23 -0500